New Harriet Tubman statue has unusual feature

Caption that reads "Did you know?"

Philadelphia has just picked the design for a new statue honoring Harriet Tubman. Perhaps you saw this news item recently. So much has been written about her extreme bravery and dedication to humankind. But seldom do we read about the fact that she backed up all her dangerous Underground Railroad activity with prayer. Prayer and […]

Susan B Anthony’s best friend Elizabeth

19th century woman holding baby

Susan B. Anthony’s best friend was Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Born November 12, 1815, Stanton was Anthony’s opposite in many ways. However, their bond of common reforms – temperance, antislavery, and women’s rights – held them together even when their differences might have torn them apart. Early years of their friendship Stanton teased about their respective […]

Frederick Douglass statue in Rochester, NY

Frederick Douglass

The Frederick Douglass statue in Rochester, NY’s Highland Park celebrates one of my hometown’s two greatest civil rights luminaries. The other is Susan B. Anthony

Great American Women of Susan B.’s Era

Susan LaFlesche Picotte

During Women’s History Month we will use this space to celebrate several great American women who were comrades of Susan B. Anthony. (Click here for an earlier blog post on Women’s History Month.) Though Miss Anthony did not know all of them, each one came from her era and worked to make us a more […]

Susan B. Anthony’s Brother Worked near Frederick Douglass

five-story building front and side

Correction: The Anthonys worked in the Reynolds Arcade, across the street from this building. Frederick Douglass had his office in the Talman Building. Sorry for the confusion. This is the Talman Building in Rochester, NY, where Susan B. Anthony’s brother and father ran an insurance business. The brother will be the focus of my talk […]

Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass association recounted in new biography

let's have tea

Susan B. Anthony And Justice For All is out in its new edition and explores her long-term association with Frederick Douglass. This monument, titled “Let’s Have Tea,” depicts two of the main characters in the book. A Multifaceted Friendship Susan and Frederick were neighbors when both moved to Rochester in the 1840s; the Douglasses frequently […]